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and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. a great show for you today. first up, the question for the economy. should we save or should we spend? what will get the economy moving faster? i'll talk to the chief proponent of spending. nobel prize winning economist paul krugman. then, the race for space. is america losing? china is building its own space station and the u.s. has to rely on russia to send our astronauts up to the stars. what is going on? >>> and the exploding middle class. in more than seven years it will triple in size to almost 2 billion people. it will change the world. we'll talk about how. >>> but, first, here's my take. those of you who follow the show reg lerly know i have long argued that cutting government spending in the midst of a weak recovery is not a path towards growth. but i have also argued that america does have a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is, the vast majority of our debt problems relate to the costs of health care in america. now that the debate over obama care is over, we should start thinking about how to get am
economist. we're talking extraordinary weakness here, especially in the two most important economies, germany and france. >> yes. what we saw towards the beginning of the year, what we were hoping was we would see in the u.s. in the second quarter and maybe a third number. what these number res sharing, while we're seeing the rate of contraction to ease in the third quarter, around 4.6% declines. what we saw at the end of the quarter, regathering momentum and that puts the usa in a weak position heading into the second quarter. >> i was going to ask, too, the there's any way, these are sentiment surveys. these are not going on out and measuring production. what it does, it oles the companies themselves, asks them about data. pretty reliable whether it's the u.s. version of these or the global ones with tracking equity prices. and the point here is, this is the first reading of sentiment in march. yet it doesn't seem as though this was necessarily nud by the latest out of cypress. this would have all fallen before this happened. >> yeah. it's asking for hard information whether it is
idea. i mean, if you look at cyprus' economy, there are two major factors to that economy. tourism and financial services. you could kill the financial services immediately right there. so it's two underpinnings. almost like when greece was doing smo of the same things. >> but you say it matters because it could spread elsewhere? >> just the thought that somebody thought this was a good idea is scary enough to me, i would think. but it's going to be one of those things. we'll have to watch and see how it folds out. but i've got a feeling it will have to turn itself around fairly quickly. >> michael, what do you think? have you changed any of your behavior in terms of allocating capital, as a result of what we've seen in the last 48 hours? >> no, not really, maria. i still think that cyprus is certainly something to watch. but i think it's just part of the negotiation process, exactly what's happening in greece. we have to watch and see if it accelerates and this idea sweeps around europe, but i doubt that's going to happen. i actually think that europe is starting to present some o
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
the day. from the economy to earnings now. we get a number of interesting quarterly reports due today as well. before the bell, we'll hear from fedex, general mills and lennar and this afternoon we have oracle. a lot to chew on for the markets. s&p by the way coming off its first three-day decline of 2013. take a look at u.s. equity futures at this hour. green arrows across the board. and then of course there's cyprus. the country's leaders are holding crisis talks today trying it avert a financial meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignan
their economy. based on ant was institutions,ree the commission, the ec be, and the imf. the commission has been working hard for many months to facilitate a sustainable i recallto help cyprus i raised the issue of financial results -- assistance program novemberirst time in 2011 with the finance minister of cyprus because of concerns about the sustainability and financial stability. been a particularly complex process in the most challenging of circumstances. already last week, we found ourselves in a situation where there were no optimal solutions ,vailable, only hard choices and that has been even more true in recent days. lagarde said the deal would restore trust in cyprus and banking system. >> it has been a laborious and could result. i would also like to salute the courage of the separate authorities -- the cypriot authorities who are taking on the challenge of putting into place and implementing in the days to, something that will number one protect the injured depositors, number two, treat the two -- the two troubled banks, and limit the treatment to those two banks, and therefore, rest
and the austerity he is putting in place has caused the economy to be really slow. >> a lot of tax increases over there in europe. we look at this austerity bit. i want to talk about this for a second. >> i want to get back to the budget then. >> talk about what is happening in washington. you know, economics discussed on tv or on the internet or on twitter, it's so depressing, because people really don't know what they are talking about and they just sort of boil it down and there is this belief through the years, that tax cuts are not a tool used. of course, tax cuts are a tool used and tax increases something that traditional are against in bad times. we hear about austerity across great britain and we never hear about the tax increases. when you talk about the fact they cut and slash spending at the same time they hike taxes, it really was a formula made to fail. >> spending cuts and tax increases both take money out of the economy and slow the economy and, yes, they create this idea of austerity. but, look. it's a balancing problem. on the one hand you need to deal with it budgets and defici
's economy after a week on the brink of disaster. talks have significantly overrun, adding to fears that the deal is far from certain. we will go live to brussels in a moment. >> president nicos anastasiades left of cyprus behind for a chilly brussels. he is trying to broker a deal with eu finance ministers by monday to secure aid for his beleaguered country. his eu colleagues are demanding the cyprus raise the sum of 5.8 billion euros itself in order to release a rescue loan package. a compulsory levy on savings may be the only answer. but major investors in cyprus's biggest bank, the bank of cyprus, could lose up to 20% of their deposits. not surprisingly, it's an unpopular measure. >> nearly everyone's going to lose some money. of course, the amount will be greater for some than for others. and that's that. >> there is anger at the nation's creditors. >> the germans are only interested in themselves. they don't care about anyone else. >> cyprus's banks have been closed for a week. the european central bank has threatened to cut off the island's emergency funding should no deal be
records, taking, and larryeating bails glazer from the economy summit. and bruce is in pennsylvania where the snow has begun. reporter: well, neil, that heavy snow from this morning has turn into light snow this afternoon and now more of a freezing rain. literally minutes ago the sun made an appears and that is rare. no blizzard here but another significant snowfall. two or throw inches around most of the region, now a slushy mess. it began this morning. we expect it will not wrap up until late tonight. this is actually the 11th day in the month of march with some kind of trace amount of snow or more. none of them any big deal but all of them irritating. last month, one day with a trace of snow. temperatures much colder this march. the average high 15 degrees colder this march than last march, and just two days in the entire month of march that the national weather service would regard as clear, day where the sun was actually out. a fair number of fender benders this morning, but overall more of a slushy mess than a real danger. the temperatures are expected to get down near freezing, so
.2948. >> some positive news for the european economy today. airbus has just signed the biggest civil aviation deal in history. it is with ryanair. >> it will provide a much-needed boost to the economy promising to secure 5000 jobs in france alone over the coming decade. >> the signatures are worth a lot of money. airbus will likely discount package of 234 plans, they have a list price of 18 billion euro. assembly will take part in france with parts from several european locations. it will be at capacity for four years. >> of bills meanwhile pride that we epitomize european success. we are working together to create jobs. >> the deal means more than money and well paying jobs. ryanair is a new customer for airbus. they have previously purchased all their planes from their arrival, boeing. >> the western-backed opposition is meeting in istanbul to p ick the new prime minister. the first tasks is creating a cabinet. >> the conflict is expected to escalate further with britain and france say they plan on our main local groups. especially when it comes to political and military priorities, they do
of the economy that are not that strong and i don't know what the sequester will bring in the month of april. >> look, the data say things are better, and i think the fed will be under a lot of pressure because interest rates are headed higher. >> at some point the fed will have to acknowledge that -- and they have -- to your point, they changed the language a little bit. it's a moderate recovery and it's a strengthening recovery. words like that. >> right. >> at some point they're going to have to acknowledge what we all seem to know which is -- they're not great, but things are getting better. now will inflation pick up and that, of course, is the fed's number one mandate. will inflation pick up until we see jobs pick up because wage inflation comes with excess demand from workers. i don't know. that's the big trillion dollar question mark. >> commodity inflation whether it be corn or copper and the strong dollar will contain inflation that's going up a great deal. housing is stabilizing and not really in the numbers. i want to take issue with some of what you said. i think we all think th
's on -- you know, it's 0.2% of their economy and, you know, we're worried about whether there's any ripple all the way over to us. >> it may want be an instant market reaction, though. it may be something that's more of a concern about whether there would be other countries that step out of the eu. >> don't you think the markets could anticipate whether there would be further trouble or not? >> i don't know. i think this is -- >> we would be seeing it if it was really -- if they he can't sell off in europe, we shouldn't be looking at it at all for our markets here. >> no. michelle, what's that? >> i know you're over there, but you don't care. >> the one ripple effect i can think of is -- the one ripple effect i can think of is that if when they wind down this bank, there's some wealthy russians or wealthy companies that had money in there that they would lose a substantial portion of, perhaps 50% of the uninsured deposits if they do a wind down. if they have a margin call, you know what i'm saying? some kind of ripple effect maybe related to a russian company or a russian individual. but when
is a big concern. china is a big concern. they said china's economy is showing symptoms that sparked the crisis in 2008, the warning and saying they risk financial crisis. obviously, concerns about china. i'm going to stick to the cypress theme and put it together. the vix, fear index popped. you see the 1275 right now, up 17%. at one point, up 13%. right now, let's look at the financials because they certainly reacted. in some cases, dramatically, and the idea of them taxing deposits there. citigroup down 2% and banks abroad hit harder. back to you. >> a full and complete report, thank you, nicole. >> for the bailout proposal, is the tax on bank deposits, and that is sparking outrage and fear that there's going to be a run on the banks there. david, chairman and chief investment officer of dumb beer land as visiers of -- cumberland, and why do you think it's a big deal, david? >> caller: well, the finance ministers, the decision has been announced. the cat is out of the bag. once you open the door to taxing a deposit when you have a liquidity crisis, you can never close the door aga
stand? and israel's minister of the economy is here to answer our questions. >>> plus, mayor michael bloomberg called starbucks ceo ridiculi ridiculist. >>> and the head of colorado's department of corrections answers the door only to be shot down. we take you to the manhunt tonight. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight with friends like these, well, president obama arrived in israel to day. it was his first trip there as president. everything seemed rosey for a little while between him and benjamin netanyahu. >> and just as we have for these past 65 years, the united states is proudo stand with you as your strongest ally and your greatest friend. >> i want to thank you for the investment you have made in our relationship and in strengthening the friendship and alliance between our two countries. >> sounded so perfect. but then -- later in the day things changed. >> iran is a grave threat to israel, a grave threat to the world, a nuclear iran. the united states is committed to dealing with it. >> each country has to make its own decisi
. that's good for 125th in the world. per sapt a gdp, $26,900. 71% of the economy service based. tourism big there. 20% is industry. 8.5% agriculture, mostly olives and citrus. in a nut shell, finance ministers are going to hold a conference call this evening to discuss a proposed bailout for the cypriot banks. the plan started this weekend included taking money from regular bank deposit, large and small, 6.75% to almost 10% if you've got more than 100,000 euros in an account over there. why are those banks in cyprus in trouble? they were heavily exposed to greek debt and we all know what happened there with the greek debt, both public and private. then the cypriot banks were national as ied to prevent an need colorado lapse. european regs, that's where the rest of europe comes in. instead of sending a bailout like it did in spain and greece, germany wants to raise money from actual people with deposits in those banks. here's how goldman sachs' paul o'neill summed it up on "squawk" this morning. >> i got off a plane from singapore saturday morning and i thought my jet lag was up but i wa
demand. moreover because of stronger growth in each economy. it has the beneficial spillovers to trading partners. there will be a test later. thank you. ashley: there are always two sides of the story. central banks have been doing it all around the world. tracy: i know. peter barnes will bring you the q&a session of bernanke's comments when they have been live. ashley: let's check these markets. nicole petallides at the nyse. you are also looking at some big tech names. nicole: i am keeping an eye on blackberry and yahoo!. down almost 3%. goldman sachs downgraded. it is not really up to par and not really doing that well. they are not seeing the sales that they had hoped. let's take a look at yahoo!. it is up one half of 1%. 23.25 a share. back to you. ashley: barely up, but it is up. thank you. tracy: boeing announcing its plan to conduct a 787 and flight today. the troubled dreamliner has been grounded since early january. we heard last week they would do a little test flight. ashley: hopefully no smoke. with the securities and exchange commission approving nasdaq's plan to pay out t
own way. toyou can go to c-span.org check out "first ladies." spoke about the economy and monetary policy. you can see all of the news conference tonight a on c-span. , our policy has two main elements. first, we decided to continue purchasing mortgage-backed perrities at a pace of -- month. it bears to emphasize that the committee has described this program in terms of a monthly pace of purchases rather than a total amount of expected purchases. evolution of the program to economic criteria. within this framework, the committee can vary the pace of purchases. at this meeting, the committee judge -- second, the committee kept the target to the federal fund rate. it will remain appropriate for a considerable time after the purchase program ends and if the economic recovery strengthens. the low range for the fund rate will be appropriate as long as the unemployment rate remains above 6.5%. if economic conditions provided in the guidance are a threshold and not triggers, crossing one or more these marshaled will not automatically lead to an increase in rates. rather the committee will
can be the linchpin in our economy over here. it's ridiculous. >> right. it should be a smaller problem. they could take care of this in other ways. they could print money or -- >> i'm not going to pick a state here. it would probably be a southern state, but a poor southern state cannot take the down the united states. >> a western state because they're not awake yet. but here we are. out of the 22 -- cyprus? >> you thought greece was small, cyprus is -- >> come on, cypriots? i remember some conflicts. i thought it was a golf course, which would be a much bigger problem to me. >> let's introduce our guest host this morning, kenny dichter, co-founder of avian. why do i always mispronounce it? because you've been b drinking it. >> avione is airplane in french and spanish. >> can we get a full shot of this? he's now the chairman of juicepress. i have been drinking this stuff for the past week, virtually, five days. >> and you know what? your skin tone has never looked better. >> no food up until this saturday. you've been doing this now -- >> 22 days. >> i've made my cleanse zero
. let's listen. >> due to the influx and further strained the economy that is already under considerable external pressures with an unstable region, the ghoebl economy recovering. but having said that as i already alluded to, we are so grateful to the u.s. assistance in solving this enormous responsibility and together continue to appeal to international community for more help to face this calamity. i had the opportunity, obviously, to talk about the peace process and we're very delighted by the vision and depth of wisdom the president showed over the past several days with israelis and palestinians. and obviously reiterate jordan's commitment to the peace process and the crucial importance of the u.s. leadership in resuming the palestinian-israeli negotiations based on the two-state solution. there is simply no other formula, no other -- two-state solution is the only way to go and if you compare that also with the radicalization of syria, together with the peace process, this is going to be a serious threat to an already volatile region. i believe there is a window of opportunity to m
the week. the bureau could recover a little bit, despite economic disappointing data. the german economy seems to lose momentum. the ifo index dropped for the first time in a month. emma we stay in frankfurt for a closer look at the numbers. the dax fell just slightly, but bigger losses over the course of the week, finishing at 7911. that is how it went in the week in the euro stoxx 50. let's call it finishing flat. across the atlantic on wall street, the dow slightly higher, 14,496. the euro trading higher at a value of $1.2979. u.s. president barack obama has been in jordan this friday on the final leg of his middle east tour. talks with jordan's king focused primarily on the civil war in neighboring syria. >> obama said he was worried syria could become a haven for muslim extremists -- when, not if president assad is ousted. he urged the international community to work together to make sure there is a credible opposition ready to step into the breach. >> the final leg of barack obama's tour of the middle east will be dominated by one issue. with the conflict in syria on going, jordan
and the people are angry. the economy is on the edge. how is this a win? >> it is a win in a technical stents -- a sense. they would not fund -- because of that overnight agreement, that bankruptcy has been averted. on the ground, in reality, there are people there who are desperate to get money out. there are concerns in brussels about future bailouts. it is only a win in that very narrow definition of not having suffered the first bankruptcy of a national bank in the european union. but beyond that, we wait and see. >> as you indicated, this is not just cyprus. it is much broader. they are concerned to save -- to say the least. what guarantees do they have at their money is safe in the eurozone? >> if you are a small savor in the bank, bureaucrats here will tell you that cyprus was one off. yes, we came close to breaking bank accounts, but it did not quite happen, so rest calm. people responding to that is that so far, every time there has been a a lot or crisis, it has been a one off. greece was a one off and it could not happen again in that form. spain, portugal, italy. what's a cyprus h
that has to do with the smart investments that we know we need to get the economy growing again, those are off the table. big tax cuts for the wealthiest americans that has to be made up by somebody and we know who that somebody is. >> thank you for coming in. there is no huge surprise that the ryan budget overwhelmingly passed in the house or that it failed in in the senate, but three senators voting against it, rand paul, ted cruz, mike lee. that's a new thing, tea partiers saying i'm even more conservative than paul ryan. is that the message? >> yeah. that is the message and also 2016 is the message. two of those three folks you mentioned have presidential ambitio ambitions. the rhine why we're in this situation in the first place is the inability to come together and pass a real budget. and really we see a new base rhine where these big tee bates are taking place, but the new sort of normal is the spending levels that were set by sequestration. and so yesterday we did see congress pass, pass a continuing resolution, pass a stopgap spending bill that went to the white house. and it
to this country and to the economy, now. on the eve of another week for the dow, many baby-boomers who rode the rollercoaster, finally seeing a recovery. the dow is finishing a ten-day rally. this is where it will end up in the morning, just over 14,500 points. and tonight, abc's bianna golodryga, tonight, with a couple you met right here on "world news." staying the course worked. >> reporter: family vacations it's what bill and kathy lived for. and what they were planning on when they invested in their 401(k). but like so many others, their nest egg took a hard fall in 2008. when we talked to them in january, they had gotten some good news. >> my retirement went crash. and the recovery has been fantastic. >> reporter: and today? >> 401(k)s have done very well since january. you're up probably around 10%-plus, in a lot of accounts. >> reporter: their accounts have doubled. some tripled since 2009, which means more family vacations. and they're not alone. with the dow having its best run in 16 years. >> starting from an environment where people thought the u.s. economy was really just done
growth but the duty is even low-skilled immigrants are good for this economy. they are benefiting not just people like me or people working in washington d.c. because they know their lawn, watched their children but this is not the zero sum game and the data is clear it is a no-brainer. john: of the immigrant pains my house we are richer? >> yes. because he is cheaper e makes construction and prices lower for all of us. john: adits minder standing everything cost less and we get richer. >> to focus on the gdp if we would provide amnesty to 12 million in legal immigrants yes a total sum of products manufactured would grow. >> the more people in the bigger it gets but it is abstract but it doesn't mean anything for the public because if you find a the government with low-end jobs gdp is rising but opportunities for meaningful growth are eroding. john: what would you do with the 12 million who are here? >> you remove them as identified by law and allow them to leave voluntarily. if we have the incentives in place they would self to port with attrition john: make it so hard they leav
is going to have some issues as well. and generally speaking the economy is likely to get worse as the conditions of the bailouts are rolled into place, as far as the street scene around here has been concerned and plenty of places taking credit cards and folks are sitting by cafes, and it's greek independence day and they're off and celebrating, not necessarily the bank out, but something indeed. stuart: thanks, rich. by the way people who are so vehement in the treat pstreet p, i believe they're bank employees and they may lose their jobs and their pensions as well and they're left with nothing and why they're so vehement on the streets there. let me go to the dow quickly. the dow is up 48 points that largely on the back of the settlement-- it's not a settlement, it's a bailout. cyprus gets it, up goes the dow, 14,557. all right. our next guest says that cyprus, what happened there, could unravel the entire euro system. economist peter morici joins us now, all right, peter. you've said this morning, i've read the article, that cyprus will be better off getting out of the euro
america's case on a daily basis because he would be's with the economy. so one of the many reasons why he chose her as secretary of state because she knew she could do that for him on a daily basis around the world. that's why i think that she would bring to him accurate reading of where things stood. what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward in terms of agreement, where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him the -- what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles but she certainly influenced a lot of decision. libya being one of them, and asia definitely. >> host: we'll get to libya next. a very interesting scenario and what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli-palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac in 2010 and she spoke there and she said farflung destinations from the chronic where she would be traveling, that issue would come up as the first, second, or third issue, and it struck me as unlikely, other than europe, that people would be focusing on this far-flung destination, and once we saw wikilea
as the economy gains steam. can this party last? it's monday, march 18th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >> hey, wow. >> who? >> they said our names. >> let's hear that again. >> cue that up again. ♪ >> "world news now." >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >> sounds nice, right. >> that's you. >> let's do it. >> that's you, me, us. welcoming a familiar face to our anchor desk. here this morning. of course, a face that you recognize. john muller, congratulations. welcome to the team. >> a thrill to be here. i have filled in dozens of times. hopefully a few of you know me. out there. like i said all morning long, i have always been a fan of the show. i always really watched it because i used to do another show cross town locally. i would look up from the makeup chair and be like those poor guys are already up and doing it. what i am about to do. i thought i was the only one up at the hour. i'm a night owl. and i have always loved the show. tradition of people sitting in the cha
are actually focused on jobs and economy, erin. they're not focused on the debt. i think you have that captive sort of republican grass root that is focused on the debt and trimming back federal government. and they've captured the sort of republican party. but the vast majority of americans are more focused on the economy and creating jobs and building stable middle class than they are on cutting the deficit. yeah, the deficit is an issue. it's not the number one issue. >> why, boehner do that? we don't have an immediate debt crisis. you would see that in the market, right? so boehner is say ing the truth. it is against what he's been saying which is the debt is a problem. why did he do that? >> he said we need to address it over the long term. that means taking steps now. but here's the thing, he is actually opening the possibility that republicans move to more favorable ground because right now the problem is that republicans are emphasizing have been emphasizing root canal economics, only fiscal austerity rather than a more positive agenda. by conceding the point that we don't have an imme
no longer control my impulse buys so i think it's good for the economy. they shouldn't be recalling them. they should be compulsory. >> make sure you buy everything nine items at a time. >> i do now, i do. >> lululemon, i stayed out of that. i work out basketball, in an old paint ball t-shirt. >> hope we never see them on rush limbaugh on "the tonight show" hosted by jimmy fallon. >> thank you to both of you. >> thank you. >> they're so funny. >>> this bowl sold for $2.2 million at auction. that's a nice investment. >> we're going to warm up. looking good, good. >> we're going to be putting this device on sanjay and raise the heart rate. >> i'm dr. sanjay gupta, this weekend, how wireless health care could change your life. >> it's very much more sophisticated way to assess somebody's fitness real time and allow them to create a plan around their fitness. >> everything's getting more and more precise, to help you elongate your career or make it the best you cannen. >> i'm continually interested in and fascinated by how much athletes, patients, everybody wants their own data. >> this sund
. >> we owe the country a balanced budget. it's a reasonable plan. grows the economy. balancing the budget is not just a sta stats tis particular call exercise. creates nor jobs. helps people keep more of their hard earned money when the other side is offering even more spending increases and tax increases. more borrowing. we are worlds apart. >> democratic proposals do not balance the budget. the fbi is investigating how on earth a man was able to pose as a pilot and gain access airways flight in philadelphia. police say the man had on an air france uniform and also an i.d. then he ended up in the jump seat right behind the airlines captain. he was caught when he failed to show his real credentials. the airline says that no passengers were ever in danger. >> that was a bizarre story. >> um-huh. >> the lie breafer congress has added 25 new songs, including this 1960's hit. ♪ come on, baby, ♪ let's do the twist. ♪ come on, baby ♪ let's do the twist. >> they said it became the excitement and energy. dick clark chubby checkers to record a new version of the song. it is more than two d
immigrants are good for this economy. they are benefitting not only high skill people like me or like all of the people working in washington, d.c. because they mow their lawn and they watch their children, but also lower skilled labors because this is not a zero sum game. the economy can expand. the data is very clear. i think it is pretty much a no brainer. >> if an immigrant paints my house somehow we are all richer because the rest of us can specialize in something else? >> yes. one of the ways because he's cheaper he makes prices much lower prices of construction much lower for all of us. >> that mahas been my understanding by this flexibility of a labor market everything costs less we can get richer. >> what you are focusing on is the gross domestic product for example if we were to provide grants and amnesty to 12 million illegal aliens the gdp tote at that time total sum of all good and products would grow. >> they would stop hiding and report more income. >> that is an abstract method. it doesn't mean anything. it means squat for "john q" public. with the holy skilled low end job
the letter, fearing high-tech investors who helped build the venture capital economy will flee to lower tax states. >> the game is rigged. you can't possibly win because we have the right to change the rules after the fact. that is what is not fair. >> governor jerry brown is reviewing the situation. now these taxpayers can request a waiver if you will, david, hoping that the governor, lawmakers hammer out a deal. if no not, no reprieve, taxman comes, 120 million going to the state from about 3,000 people who thought they were helping small business. david? david: it can happen here. it is happening here in california! william la jeunesse. thanks, man. >>> disney world turning some kids away at the park gates. that story when we go "off the desk" in a just a couple minutes. ♪ your finances can't manage themselves, but that doesn't mean they won't try. bring all your finances togeth with the help of the one person who can, a certified financial planner professional. cfp -- let's make a plan. ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its overall reliance on foreign imports th the launch of
economy. now evidence they might be tanking our economy. you remember solyndra that cost american taxpayers more than $500 million. turns out it may have a successor. >> steve: months after opening, the oregon based solar panel company, solo power, is facing layoffs, putting 250 million of our taxpayer dollars in jeopardy. apparently stuart varney, we learned nothing from solyndra. >> no, we have learned absolutely nothing. the president is now doubling down again on green energy projects. he still believes the government can pick winners in green energy and he still thinks that maybe we'll get the technology right to get green power in the future. wrong on all counts. we're so far failed with these green energy products. i think we've got a list of all the green energy project which is have really gotten into deep trouble, either bankrupt, laid people off, they've lost a ton of money. it's one after another. it's very, very long list. >> steve: what do you think it was about this particular solo power thing that the government said oh, we got to give them a bunch of dough? >> the
economy. that is not a fair competition. they troy and new york are two different questions but interestingly, middle size cities have also used creativity, innovation, their position change and detroit is beginning to look at the digital age and beginning to find that they too can get innovative companies taking over with the auto industry, midsized cities have their own attractions, many of the most attractive cities to live in, one reason cities are powerful as people love living in cities. they come to them and go to the most creative, entrepreneurial inventive people go to the most attractive cities and a lot of those cities of between five hundred thousand and 1 million and that attract very creative innovators who can solve problems so there are definitely issues between big cities and small cities that we need to deal with the also some strength. finally the french case that was mentioned over here, yes, french mayors are not elected, they are appointed as part of a political system. he was not such a successful president. and mentioned france was holland was a succe
. how much of a threat is the happening in europe to the u.s. economy right now? >> also, two huge interviews still to come. meredith whitney tells us why she's very bullish on one of wall street's biggest banks and right now. and cit group chairman and ceo john thain reacts to the rumor that will not go away. namely that his company has been shopping for a suitor. john will try and lay those fears aside once again, those rumors. >> a look at where we stand as we approach this final stretch, final hour of the day. dow jones industrial down about 26 points. had been down 110. we are well off of the lows. nasdaq looks like this. also pretty volatile in the afternoon here. as you can see, it is down about five points at 3243. s&p 500 really similar move here. down five points. equities showing great resilience, pushing back from a triple digit loss today. will the crisis abroad keep the markets in jeopardy? >> you had to be named steve to be on the panel today for the most part. steven water from russell investments, steve sacks. steve liesman is with us. and then there's that guy san
a banking collapse that could impact other world economies. right now the european union chief is trying to get a last-minute deal together. >>> on tuesday and wednesday the u.s. supreme court will hold hearings on same-sex marriage challenges. proposition 8 and the defense of marriage act. people are already camping out mere the supreme court in washington to get in to the hearings. on thursday, we will find out which cars get a world car award. winner in power categories announced at the new york international auto show. shout-outs go to best all-around, best performance, green cars, and best design. that's going to do it for me. see you throughout the week p much more straight ahead with don lemon. >>> no golf for you. i want to you take a look at this. this is a pga course in orlando where tiger woods was leading before mother nature put the smackdown on it. the weather is severe in many parts of the country today. ridiculous storms here. blizzard there. live from snowy dayton, ohio in just a moment. speaking of tiger, if he wins tomorrow, he will be the new number one golfer in the
's straining their economy here. there's also fear about those chemical weapons in syria, will those come across the borderer and cause more violence and chaos? when i sat down yesterday with the israeli president, shimon peres, he said king abdullah and other leaders in the arab world need to step up here to stop the violence in syria. take a listen. >> it's an arab problem, it's an arab organization and league. they have to do what the africans did in africa, organize their force under the auspices of the united nations and stop the bloodshed. >> reporter: but so far king abdullah has said he opposes any kind of foreign military intervention in syria, so we're till at a stand still in that con felix. we'll be looking -- conflict. we'll be looking for that at the news conference and, let's not forget there's pressure on president obama as well not just from republicans back home in the u.s., but also democrats like senator carl levin saying that the president should help set up a no-fly zone around syria, maybe there should be some sort of strategic surgical air strikes against president
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